DAR holds May meeting

The Landmark Center was the location for the Daughters of the American Revolution’s luncheon meeting on May 9. Regent Louise Hansen led the eight members and two guests in the DAR Ritual, Pledge of Allegiance, and the American’s Creed.
The president general’s message recalled her theme of the last three years: Celebrating America. DAR has celebrated America by recording more than 12.5 million volunteer hours to our communities and to our nation.
The national defense message described the history of the Air National Guard. It is administered by the National Guard Bureau, a joint bureau of the departments of the Air Force and the Army. The mission is to provide protection of life and property and also to preserve peace, order, and public safety. Wanda Shough was appointed the national defense chairman for the new year.
Catheryn Vaughn’s article, “Our nation’s enduring symbol of unity and freedom” describes the U.S. flag. In times of triumph, turmoil and tragedy, the flag has united the United States. It inspired the poetry that became the national anthem.
It has flown at inaugurations and has draped over the coffins of presidents. Sons of slaves carried it up Cuba’s San Juan Hill, it was gassed and tattered on World War I battlefields and later raised by Marines on Iwo Jima. It was hoisted above the rubble of the World Trade Center after the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001.
For a green and healthy lawn during the summer months, it will need approximately one inch of water each week. A good way to see if your lawn needs watering is to step on the grass. If it springs back up when you move, it doesn’t need water. If it stays flat, your lawn is ready for water. This was the conservation minute from Elva Haden.
Flo Bell’s health minute suggests that if you have heartburn but don’t have antacids with you, drink a glass of water. Water will wash out the acid.
Catheryn Vaughn’s Indian minute described the life of Apache leader, Geronimo. He acquired a fearless fighter reputation while fighting troops that murdered his wife, children, and mother. He resisted U S efforts to settle his people on reservations and was denounced a murderous renegade. Geronimo was finally persuaded to surrender in 1886 and died a prisoner at Fort Sill in 1909.
Janice Axelson’s history report was on the Boston Tea Party. On the night of December 16, 1773, Samuel Adams and the Sons of Liberty disguised as Mohawk Indians boarded three ships in the Boston harbor and threw 342 chests of tea overboard. It took nearly three hours for more than 100 colonists to empty the tea into Boston Harbor. The chests held more than 90,000 pounds (45 tons) of tea, which would cost nearly $1,000,000 dollars today.
New officers were installed for the year beginning in September.
Betty Banks,
Corresponding Secretary

Pictured are (left to right): Flo Bell, chaplain; Betty Banks, corresponding secretary; Onie Vaughn, library; Elva Haden, first vice regent; Janice Axelson, historian; Catheryn Vaughn, recording secretary; Wanda Shough, registrar; Louise Hansen, regent. (Not pictured: Mary Ann Franklin, treasurer.)
Pictured are (left to right): Flo Bell, chaplain; Betty Banks, corresponding secretary; Onie Vaughn, library; Elva Haden, first vice regent; Janice Axelson, historian; Catheryn Vaughn, recording secretary; Wanda Shough, registrar; Louise Hansen, regent. (Not pictured: Mary Ann Franklin, treasurer.)
Subscribe

more recommended stories