Reynolds Homestead programs to honor Black History Month

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The Reynolds Homestead will offer programs in music, history and film in February to honor Black History Month, with events that include:

Bishop Burgie Penn will lead the annual Gospel Concert Celebrating Black History Month on Sunday, Feb. 9 at 3 p.m. Gospel choirs from churches across the region will participate in the event at the Reynolds Homestead.

Annual Gospel Concert, with Bishop Burgie Penn, who will once again organize and lead the annual Gospel Concert Celebrating Black History Month on Sunday, Feb. 9 at 3 p.m. Gospel choirs from churches across the region will join Penn and the Trinity Choir for an afternoon of praise and worship. This event is free to the public and everyone is invited. There is always a big crowd and doors will open at 2 p.m. for admission.

Penn is the pastor of Trinity Church of the Living God, and is also an active participant in the community, serving Patrick County as Ministerial Society participant, Coordinator of the Reynolds Homestead Black History Program, Water Wheel Patrick County Revival, Hospice volunteer and numerous other auxiliaries.

Dr. Lucien Holness, Virginia Tech Assistant Professor of History, will present a lecture “Race and Freedom on Virginia’s Easter Shore: The Making of A Slave Society, 1621-1676” on Sunday, Feb. 16 at 2 p.m. at the Reynolds Homestead.

History Lecture – Virginia Tech assistant professor of history, Dr. Lucien Holness, will present “Race and Freedom on Virginia’s Easter Shore: The Making of A Slave Society, 1621-1676” on Sunday, Feb. 16 at 2 p.m.

In 1621, “Antonio a Negro,” a slave from Angola, was sold to the English at Jamestown. When he was awarded his freedom sometime around 1635, “Antonio a Negro” changed his named to Anthony Johnson. As a free man, Johnson acquired a modest estate—at one point even owning a slave. By the late seventeenth century, the free status of black men like Johnson on Virginia’s eastern shore became precarious. This talk looks at the life of Anthony Johnson as an entry point into understanding race relations in early colonial Virginia and how the colony transformed into a slave society.

Holness teaches courses in African American and early American history. His research focuses on American slavery, the abolitionist movement, and norther black politics during the nineteenth century. He recently received his PhD from the University of Maryland, College Park.

This lecture is free and open to the public. Doors will open at 1 p.m.

“If Beale Street Could Talk” will be featured on Thursday, Feb. 20 at 6 p.m. during Reynolds Homestead’s Dinner and Movie Night. Reservations are required for dinner. (Photo used with permission from Swank, Inc.)

Dinner and Movie Night

The Reynolds Homestead’s Dinner and Movie Night in February will feature the 2018 film “If Beale Street Could Talk” on Thursday, Feb. 20 at 6 p.m.

The film, set in the 1970s, tells the story of African-American teen sweethearts Fonny and Tish. The two are ripped apart when Fonny is wrongly arrested for the rape of a Puerto Rican woman. While seeking justice for Fonny, a pregnant Tish relies on her Harlem community, including her sister, mother Sharon and future mother-in-law.

Dinner will feature herb braised pork roast with gravy, mashed potatoes, Southern fried cabbage, and cornbread – followed by pineapple upside down cake for dessert. The meal will start with a green salad and a house-made herb vinaigrette. The cost of dinner is $15 per person, and reservations are required.  The movie is free, and begins at 6:45 p.m. You do not have to attend dinner to view the movie.

To make reservations, call the Reynolds Homestead at 276-694-7181; seating is limited. Early reservations are encouraged.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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